With unofficial vote tallies, and 19 out of 19 precincts fully reporting, Torrance County has a new county clerk and county commissioner.

Torrance County saw a turnout of 70.2% of registered voters, as 7,261 voters cast their ballots in the general election.

The Torrance County Clerk’s race pitted Democrat Rubena Miranda against Republican Yvonne Otero. Otero won 64% of the vote, or 4,524 votes, while Miranda got 2,543 votes for 36% of the total.

Incumbent Democrat Javier Sanchez lost his bid for re-election to former commissioner and Republican, LeRoy Candelaria in the race for District 3 county commission seat.

Candelaria got 1,419 votes for 61%, while Sanchez got 1,190 votes and 39%.

The County Treasurer’s race was unopposed, in which incumbent and Republican Tracy Sedillo got 5,695 votes.

How Torrance County Voted

In State Senate District 19, Republican Gregg Schmedes won 2,455 votes or 64% of Torrance County votes, Democrat Claudia Risner garnered 1,206 or 31%, and Libertarian John McDivett garnered 172 or 4% of the vote.

In Senate District 39, Republican Joey Tiano won 2,084 of Torrance County’s votes, or 65%, and Democrat Liz Stefanics garnered 1,144 votes or 35%.

In House District 50, incumbent and Democrat Matthew McQueen garnered 1,488 or 33% of the vote in Torrance County, while Republican Christina Estrada got 2,854 votes or 63%, and Libertarian Jerry Gage garnered 194 votes or 4%.

In House District 70, Republican Nathan Dial won 1,800 or 70% of the vote in Torrance County, and Democrat Ambrose Castellano garnered 760 votes, or 30%.

For Judicial Retentions in Torrance County, Jacqueline Medina was voted to stay as Judge of the Court of Appeals; Mercedes Murphy was voted to stay as Judge of the 7th Judicial District, Division 1; Matthew Reynolds was voted to stay as the 7th Judicial District, Division 2; and Shannon Murdock was voted to stay as Judge of the 7th Judicial District, Division 3.

In Torrance County, residents voted no to Constitutional Amendment 1, which would allow the governor to appoint members to the Public Regulation Commission, 3,781 votes or 59%, to 2,655 or 41%.

In Torrance County, residents voted yes to Constitutional Amendment 2, which amends Article 20, Section 3 of the New Mexico Constitution, with 3,315 votes or 52%, to 3,005 or 48%. The amendment would standardize the dates that elected officials start to serve their terms.

Torrance County residents voted yes to state Bond Question A, with 3,858 votes or 60%, to 2,596 or 40%, to issue up to $33 million for senior facility improvements.

Torrance County voters also voted yes to state Bond Question B, with 3,576 votes or 55%, to 2,883 or 45% authorizes issuance of bonds up to $9.7 million for school and library acquisitions and facilities.

Torrance County residents also voted yes to state Bond Question C, with 3,462 or 54%, to 2,998 or 46% to issue bonds up to $156 million for higher education around the state.

Leota Harriman
Leota Harriman

Leota started working for The Independent in 2006, working her way up through the ranks. An employee buyout in 2010 led to her ownership of the newspaper. Leota has served on the board of the N.M. Press Association, and is currently its First Vice President. She is passionate about health and wellness, especially mental health, and loves making art. She can be reached at news.ind.editor@gmail.com.